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Trailer Park Boys releases 12th season

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Trailer Park Boys releases 12th season

Julian (left), Bubbles (middle), and Ricky (right).

Julian (left), Bubbles (middle), and Ricky (right).

Photo Courtesy of ReleaseDateTV.com

Julian (left), Bubbles (middle), and Ricky (right).

Photo Courtesy of ReleaseDateTV.com

Photo Courtesy of ReleaseDateTV.com

Julian (left), Bubbles (middle), and Ricky (right).

Riley Mankin, Reporter

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Years after its humble beginnings in 2001 as an obscure Canadian cult-TV-show, Trailer Park Boys has grown vastly in popularity. As of today, there have been three films and several TV specials on Netflix.

The lewd, raunchy mockumentary is sure to make you laugh until you hurt if you like edgy, yet simplistic humor.

Sunnyvale Trailer Park, a fictional community located in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, is home to Ricky (Robb Wells), Julian (John Paul Tremblay) and Bubbles (Mike Smith), a trio of best friends who have lived in the park their whole life and whose day to day rituals are the focus of each episode.

The group’s shenanigans usually result in conflict with other residents of the park, or most often, the law.

However, the aimless plot is not what makes Trailer Park Boys worth watching. One of the best parts of the show is its unique, detailed supporting characters that develop as you watch.

By the end of the first few episodes, you will have been introduced to many of the familiar faces of the trailer park and entertained by them beyond your expectations due to each one’s dysfunctional nature.

For example, two frequently featured supporting characters are Sunnyvale’s main antagonists.

Trailer park supervisor, Jim Lahey (John Dunsworth), an ex-police officer who was fired because of his drinking problem, and his submissive assistant, Randy (Patrick Roach), who loves cheeseburgers and hates wearing shirts, constantly bother Ricky, Julian and Bubbles. Every run-in with Mr. Lahey and Randy is sure to crack you up as they display every little detail of their character.

The mockumentary style of filming, also used in shows like The Office and Parks and Recreation, is another one of Trailer Park Boys’ best features. The technique uses long scenes and lots of handheld camera work, to simulate a documentary.

Many scenes include dialogue and other interactions between the characters and the cameramen. There is one episode where the sound person is shot on one of Ricky’s escapades.

The writer of the show for the first seven seasons, Mike Clattenburg, said that most of the script was only loose plot points and that many lines are totally ad-libbed, giving each scene a sense of realism.

After the seventh season, Wells, Tremblay and Smith bought the rights to the show from its original owners, and continued to produce the show in the same style.

The 12th season of Trailer Park Boys released on Netflix on March 30, 2018, with most of the original cast still creating the same hilarious content they started with.

At only 20-30 minutes an episode and six to 10 episodes per season, it is easy to binge watch and keeps you laughing the whole way through.

Just as in previous seasons, the boys seek refuge from their life as career criminals, their big ticket this time Bubbles’ beer company, Freedom 45. They do their best to stay on the straight and narrow, but in true Trailer Park Boys frashion, nothing goes as planned.

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Trailer Park Boys releases 12th season