Leaving Oracle.

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Leaving Oracle.

Oraclearena.com

Oraclearena.com

Oraclearena.com

Ella Granelli, Online Editor

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On June 13th, the Warriors played their last game in Oakland, where for forty-seven years served as the backdrop for triumph, defeat, and redemption. Five championships call the stadium there home and represents not only the end of an era for the Warriors as a team but also Oakland and the Bay Area as a whole.

Like many, I agreed the leaving Oakland was a travesty. There are many demographics in Oakland, some are rich, others are poor, but above all else, the Warriors reunited everyone. Not having this dynamic anymore feels off, and It also doesn’t help that another iconic Oakland team, the Raiders, were leaving to another more “extravagant” city of Las Vegas. In response, fans created the “keep the Warriors in Oakland” movement that spread like wildfire, and fans alike agreed that keeping the Warriors in Oakland was worth the fight.

But the dreams of moving the Warriors to the hub of the Bay Area raged on, and on October 5th, 2019 they will play their first preseason game at the Chase Center against the Los Angeles Lakers.

My experience with the Warriors and the arena steams back to when I was younger. I grew up in Yosemite, so I didn’t attend games very often. However, despite how dysfunctional my family was back then, we’d always come together and watch the games on TV. It was our tradition, and even if it was temporary, it connected us.

Attending games became one of the stables of my childhood. I remember my brothers would be loud and rally on the team, while I enjoyed grabbing popcorn and trying to copy the cheerleader’s dance moves. We would record the games on our VCR, and once we arrived home, we would watch them over to find ourselves amongst the crowd

Once my parents split, and I left Yosemite for the city, my relationship with the Bay Area and the Warriors had changed. Now, it felt like I was in the center of it all. Every time the Warriors were closer to a championship, there were miniature parties that I could hear from my small Noe Valley apartment and rallies through the streets, something utterly foreign compared to the quiet countryside of Yosemite. When I would come back from school breaks or holidays, I would enjoy seeing the arena when I went passed the freeway, as banners flew with my favorite players proudly showcased on them. In these moments, I knew I was coming home.

I felt every lose and every win harder, its what bonded me to the team and the bay area as a whole. Its all anyone would talk about in school; no matter would gender you were everyone discussed the games together. When I went back to visit my family in Yosemite, I would tell my brothers about attending games, and would even still watch and try and find me amongst the crowd.

As the Warriors are playing there last couple of games in Oakland, it is honestly hard for me to see it go. I’ve had so many fond memories there, and I wish I could relive every last moment.

But at this time, my junior year is also ending. In the next couple of months, I’ll to leave certain memories, people, and other aspects of my life behind. Instead of excessively dwelling upon the Warriors leaving Oracle and Oakland, I realized that the memories and good times I’ve had at the stadium and loving the Warriors aren’t going anywhere, and I have to accept the natural progression of change.

I understand the view of fans in Oakland who are still upset about the Warriors leaving, they’ve been a crucial part to there history and culture and have the right to feel the way they do. I’ve learned to deal with it by moving forward and knowing that in the future, I’ll be able to cheer on one of my favorite teams again, while also making new memories with friends and family in the process.