Bay Area shelter-in-place extend through May 31

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Jack Reuter

The Brookside Elementary School field is empty amidst shelter-in-place.

This week, public health officials from Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara counties announced reducing shelter-in-place restrictions and extending it to May 31.

After more than a month of sheltering in place to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, the Bay Area counties plan to relax lockdown restrictions beginning May 4, announced by Santa Clara County Public Health Officer Dr. Sarah Cody. Starting Monday, construction projects, businesses that primarily operate outdoors, and certain state parks will open, all with safety precautions.

Health officials declared that further decisions would depend on the number of COVID-19 cases, the degree of protective gear available for healthcare workers, adequate testing, and contact tracing to isolate exposed individuals.

The outdoor businesses now open include gardeners, nursery, and landscape companies. Restrictions on real estate will also be lifted, with limitations on house tours. Restaurants or cafes with outside seating are not part of this exemption and will remain closed.

Daycare and summer camps will be allowed, but with capacity maxed at 12 children to ensure that social distancing occurs. California guidelines mandate the children of essential workers to take precedence over others for these facilities, as they are the ones most in need. While outdoor limitations have been eased, high contact areas like playgrounds are still closed. 

I want to just pause and recognize just how far we have come and to express my gratitude for the collective sacrifice that has averted a catastrophe in our region.”

— Dr. Sarah Cody

Dr. Cody finished her press briefing thanking the Bay Area’s efforts to reduce the spread. 

“I want to just pause and recognize just how far we have come and to express my gratitude for the collective sacrifice that has averted a catastrophe in our region. We have slowed the spread, flattened the curve, preserved our hospital capacity, and prevented many, many deaths,” Dr. Cody said.

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